Issue 55 - Revision & Self-Editing - Joanna Penn, Kate Sullivan, Annette Rogers


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Issue 55 - Revision & Self-Editing - Joanna Penn, Kate Sullivan, Annette Rogers

 

EDITOR'S DESK

  1. REVISION & SELF-EDITING: THE TWO MOST IMPORTANT TOOLS IN YOUR WRITER’S TOOLBOX

Self-editing is probably the hardest task a writer must undertake, but it’s the most important tool in your writer’s toolbox. Why? Not because it can take a mediocre work to greatness, not because it can make your piece perfect—because it takes your work to final. If you are committed to finishing those drafts that are languishing on your computer, this issue is for you! Whether you need help editing an article, novel, or revising an over-edited Frankenmonstered manuscript, we have a solution that you can put to use today. MORE >>

     

ONLINE WORKSHOPS & WRITING CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, creativity, memoir, personal essay, grammar, food writing, freelance writing, novel writing, finding a literary agent, blogging, social networking for authors, independent publishing, and more. MORE >>

     

FEATURES

  2. LIFE AS AN EDITING WARRIOR: REVISING AND SLASHING TO WIN THE BATTLE

As the author of a weekly syndicated column, I routinely experience two things feared by most writers: a deadline and the need for expedited editing (there’s an oxymoron). The notion of writing an article or short story and letting it sit for a few days or a week prior to editing is not going to fit with my real-life calendar—and probably not yours either. Over the years, I’ve developed a step-by-step approach I call “Warrior Editing.” The steps can be completed quickly; I estimate a person experienced with the method can review a 750-word article in an hour—sans resting time. By Jill Pertler. MORE >>

     
  3. THE LAYERED EDIT: A STEP-BY-STEP MANUSCRIPT EDITING PROCESS

I’m always surprised when an aspiring writer finishes a draft, runs it through spell check, and sends it out. I’m not surprised when a writer gets a rejection. Revision is as vital as original writing. The first draft is about passion and creativity and flow. The edits give you the chance to work on structure, language usage, layer in settings and senses, and make the difference between a decent manuscript and a great one. Over the years, I’ve come up with a layered editing process that’s served me well for short stories, plays, novellas, and novels. Now, I’m going to share the process with you. These steps are done after your initial draft, but before you show anything to a trusted reader. By Devon Ellington. MORE >>

     
  4. HELP! I’VE FRANKENMONSTERED MY MANUSCRIPT! WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR REVISION TECHNIQUES NEED REVISING

Many writers jump into revision with complete confidence only to find themselves alone in a dark room with their maniacal manuscript staring back via the eerie glare of a computer screen. It has happened to me (more than) once; and in fact, I was so desperate last year that I wrestled my manuscript into a suitcase and flew to New York in search of answers. Katherine Higgs-Coulthard chats with Kate Sullivan, editor at Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, and authors Jody Lamb, Barbara Shoup, and Cathy Day who share their best advice on how to tame your own Franken-novel. MORE >>

     
  5. SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE ROLE OF THE BETA READER

Before you can get to the rewriting phase, you need to know exactly what needs to be rewritten. The answer to this question varies from author to author, depending on their path to publication, but typically includes some combination of editors, copy editors, and beta readers. The first two are pretty straightforward. Beta readers, on the other hand, are hard to put a finger on. Tiffany Jansen interviews authors Jody Hedlund, Stephen Leather, Joanna Penn, and Chuck Sambuchino to find out just what beta readers are and what they do. MORE >>

     
  6. REVISION, REWORK, REWRITE: HOW TO GET YOUR WORK BACK OUT WHEN YOUR TARGET EDITOR SAYS NO

By the time a magazine editor rejects your article, you’ve been struck with another great idea. You can now either spend your time exploring a new idea or try to market the rejected piece. What would you choose? The drudgery of marketing or the rush of something new? When faced with marketing, even multi-published authors often choose to work on their latest piece, especially if they don’t have a second market in mind for the rejected work. Drafts pile up. Instead of letting them gather electronic dust, why not take some of them to final? Sue Bradford Edwards shows you how to sell more of your work and get your existing pieces into circulation. MORE >>


COLUMNS

  7. 10 QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY 2 EDITORS: REVISING YOUR MANUSCRIPT BEFORE YOU SUBMIT

If one of your goals this year is seeing your name on a book cover, you have plenty of company. According to NaNoWriMo’s website, the final word count for November’s National Novel Writing Month was over three billion. How do you make your work stand out from the crowd? Elizabeth Maria Naranjo interviews Kelly Lynne from Book Editing Associates and Annette Rogers from Poisoned Pen Press, who chat about everything from writing in a particular genre to how a writer knows when it’s time to stop revising and submit. Plus, if you are writing a mystery, you will want to read what Annette looks for when evaluating Poisoned Pen Press’s manuscripts! MORE >>

     
  8. STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN: THE THREE STEPS TO STARTING YOUR FREELANCE EDITING BUSINESS

Many writers have the natural ability to find mistakes in text, to make clarifications to syntax, and to perfect rough copy. But have you ever considered turning your natural editing talents into a side job or even a full-time freelance career? It’s quite possible, and success is likely to come to those who can combine shrewd editing skills with a business mindset. Allena Tapia shares three steps to setting up your own freelance editing shop. MORE >>

     
  9. HOW TO MATCH YOUR QUERY WITH YOUR MANUSCRIPT

Your latest query, to your joy, gets accepted, and you’re assigned the article. You negotiate a little with the editor, agree to the word count, and accept a nice fee. So filled with excitement, you plunge into writing. When you see the editor’s reply, “Sorry, this isn’t what we expected; we must retract our offer,” you’re puzzled and shocked. Many writers have had such experiences, especially novices. We think that an editor’s acceptance of our query is license to spill. It isn’t—it’s an editor’s declaration of belief that you will deliver what you teased. If you don’t, your credibility with this editor is lost, and you’ve little chance of another assignment. Noelle Sterne shows you how to match your query with your manuscript—along with advice from expert freelancers Jenna Glatzer, Michelle Ruberg, and Erika Dreifus, and writer/editor/publisher Moira Allen. She also breaks down a query she wrote for The Writer magazine and shows us why it was successful. MORE >>

CLASSIFIEDS

   

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Issue 55 - Revision & Self-Editing - Joanna Penn, Kate Sullivan, Annette Rogers
Life as an Article Editing Warrior
The Layered Edit
How To Revise Your Franken-Novel - Kathy Higgs-Coulhard, Kate Sullivan, Jody Lamb, Cathy Day, Barbara Shoup
Shedding Light on the Beta Reader - Joanna Penn, Stephen Leather, Chuck Sambuchino, Jody Hedlund
Revision Rework Rewrite - A Rejection is Not the End
Match Your Query to Your Manuscript
10 Questions Answered by 2 Editors - Kelly Lynne, Annette Rogers
Stairway to Heaven - Starting Your Freelance Editing Business
Fall 2012 Flash Fiction Contest Winners!
So, What Does a Literary Agent Do? Elizabeth Evans, Kristina Holmes, Jessica Regel
Jessica Sinsheimer
Impressing the Gatekeepers: Jessica Faust, Heather Osborn, Stephany Evans
Marcelle Soviero
Avon Impulse: Seeking Romance Writers - Exectuive Editor Lucia Macro
20 Questions with Lisa Leshne
How to Sell Your Manuscript Without and Agent - Rachel Eddey, Christine Clifford, Janice Booth, Erin Lale
A Guide to the Gatekeepers for Authors and Freelancers by Alena Tapia
Publishers Seeking Unagented Children's and YA Manuscripts
Facebook Best Practices for Profiles, Pages, Groups, and Posts for Writers
The Two Sides of Social Media - How to Be Your Own Publicist
How to Promote with Pinterest
Create Multiple Streams of Income for Your Blog
Slam: Drive Traffic to Your Blog Today & How to Sell E-books On a Nich Blog
Blogging in a Social Media Landscape - Samara O'Shea, Shira Lazar, Josie Loza, Krista Canfield
Sowing and Reaping the Ten Benefits of Blogging
Online Markets - Websites that Pay
 
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