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Winter 2017 Flash Fiction Contest Winners

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We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect. ~ Anais Nin

SPRING 2017 FLASH FICTION CONTEST

    SUMMER 2017 FLASH FICTION CONTEST WITH GUEST JUDGE LITERARY AGENT QURESSA ROBINSON

Do you need some writing inspiration this summer? Contests are a great way to spark your creativity, and you may even win a prize! Get your best work together and consider entering the WOW! quarterly flash fiction contest with guest judge, literary agent Quressa Robinson of the D4EO Literary Agency. Stop by the contest page, download the pdf guidelines, and read all about Quressa’s preferences. The Summer Contest is open to all genres of fiction between 250 - 750 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. This season, we've raised the cash prizes! Deadline: August 31, 2017. MORE >>

     

WRITING WORKSHOPS & ONLINE CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, creativity, memoir, personal essay, grammar, food writing, freelance writing, novel writing, blogging, social networking for authors, independent publishing, branding for authors, poetry writing, copy editing, literary devices, working with a literary agent, writing scenes, book reviewing, travel writing and more. MORE >>

     

FEATURES

  1. WRITING ABOUT SENSITIVE TOPICS FOR YOUNG ADULTS: ELLEN HOPKINS, CHERYL RAINFIELD, AND JAY ASHER

For YA authors Ellen Hopkins, Cheryl Rainfield, and Jay Asher, no topic is off limits. Between the three of them, they have addressed subjects like suicide, drug abuse, cutting, prostitution, and sexual abuse. Each of their books has received high acclaim and awards alongside criticism for writing about such controversial topics for young people. Despite the critics, they plan to continue to give teens a voice by writing books about sensitive topics and showing their readers, they are not alone. Kerrie Flanagan interviews these authors about writing for young adults. MORE >>

     
  2. HOW TO BE A SUCCESSFUL INTERNATIONAL FREELANCE WRITER & HOW FIVE INTERNATIONAL WRITERS GOT THEIR FIRST BREAK

Being an international writer can be tricky. Freelancer problems like getting paid on time, proving your writing capabilities, meeting clients on a mutually optimal time, and keeping up with trends become a bit more problematic when you are in a different country or even on a different continent than your clients. But this post isn’t about the challenges. It’s about how to become a successful international writer via tips from writers who have overcome these issues and got that seemingly elusive first break. Pinar Tarhan (Turkey) shares the story of landing her first three gigs. She chats with international freelancers Olga Mecking (The Netherlands), Bernadette Geyer (Germany), Gila Green (Israel), and Suchi Rudra (digital nomad) about how they got their first break. She also shares her personal go-to list of online resources for freelance writers. MORE >>

     
  3. LITERARY AGENT TO INDIE AUTHORS: STEPHANIE PHILLIPS OF SBR MEDIA

Last year, I signed with literary agent Stephanie Phillips of SBR Media. She was a new agent, but came highly recommended by a few of my author friends. After having self-published around thirty novels, I knew exactly what I was looking for in an agent. I needed someone who could assist me in more ways than simply securing traditional deals. After one phone conversation with Stephanie, I knew she was the right one for me. She understood the uniqueness of the indie market, but also had insight into traditional publishing as well. Signing with her has been a joy. Not only did she help me obtain my first traditional book deal, but she’s assisted me in my self-published releases; and more than that, she’s become a trusted confidant and friend. That’s why I’m excited to introduce you to her. By Amber Garza. MORE >>

     
  4. DANICA DAVIDSON: FROM REJECTION TO SEVENTEEN BOOK CONTRACTS

Danica Davidson has an amazing success story to share. What you can learn from her are several lessons, including: you never know where an assignment will lead you and persistence most definitely brings success. After you read her personal journey of being rejected for years and now having contracts for seventeen books (yes, seventeen!), we’re sure you’ll be busy figuring out how to pursue your own dreams and create a pathway to writing success. Interview by Margo L. Dill. MORE >>

     
  5. HOW TO WRITE WITH (OR DESPITE) KIDS

As co-editor of the Literary Reflections Department at Literary Mama, I see a lot of submissions along the lines of, “It’s so hard to write with kids.” While we look for essays that delve more deeply into the ways in which writing informs the parenting experience and vice versa, this premise is so true it hurts—writing with kids is hard. I know; I have a fifteen-year-old and eleven-year-old twins. It was hard when they were babies and toddlers, and it’s hard now that they’re tweens and teens. Yet, it wasn’t until I had kids that I felt I had something worth writing about. Before kids, my writing lacked focus, purpose, passion. I always assumed I’d have time to become a writer later, in some distant future. Once my kids were born, writing took on an urgency I could not ignore. I had to get the words down on paper. By Andrea Lani. MORE >>

     
  6. YOUR WRITING NICHE IS MORE THAN A TOPIC

I’m sure you’ve read the conventional wisdom on choosing a niche: combine your passion and knowledge, keep it narrow but not too narrow, and work until you’re seen as an expert in your field. This works, sure, but for us writers it’s only half of what your niche could be. Depending on how you want to spend your work hours, there’s a whole other interpretation of the word niche because your niche is more than a topic. It can also be a specialty, a certain format or type of writing. Kristy Rice shares twenty eight specialty niches that could sustain a lucrative writing career. MORE >>

     
  7. HOW I BUILT A PLATFORM OF 100 CROWDFUNDING SUPPORTERS IN 45 DAYS

Running a crowdfunding campaign is not just a trendy approach to funding your book through a public Internet campaign, but it is also a great way to build your platform. For forty-five grueling days, I reached out to more than two thousand family members, friends, and acquaintances in attempt to fund my memoir, Accidental Soldier: A Memoir of Service and Sacrifice in the Israel Defense Forces. As I planned, I would soon learn that launching my campaign would take a ton of dedication, enthusiasm, and organization. These eight steps helped me with finding sponsors and building my platform. By Dorit Sasson. MORE >>

     
  8. TELLING THE STORY IN CAPTIONS: WRITING CUTLINES FOR PICTORIAL HISTORIES

Thousands of historians, preservationists, and yes, authors begin their published careers writing pictorial histories. Some writers move on beyond this niche while others find themselves at home relaying the histories of their communities, counties, regions, or highways indefinitely. There are challenges with writing to the image, but with a few guidelines in mind, caption-writing can be a fine-tuned skill. Author Cheryl Eichar Jett has written six pictorial history books for Arcadia Publishing and over a hundred historical articles with captioned images, and shares her best tips for breaking into this niche market. MORE >>

     
  9. MAXIMIZING THE MINIMUM: POWER AND URGENCY IN NONFICTION – AN INTERVIEW WITH BREVITY’S MANAGING EDITOR KELLY SUNDBERG

Kelly Sundberg is managing editor of Brevity: A Journal of Concise Literary Nonfiction. Published quarterly, Brevity features extremely brief (750 words or less) essays by well-known and emerging writers as well as essays on craft and book reviews. In addition to her role as editor, Kelly is an acclaimed author, a doctoral candidate at Ohio University, and the single parent of a ten-year-old boy. Kelly began her blog, Apology not Accepted, after receiving a court-ordered letter of apology from her abusive ex-husband. Katherine Higgs-Coulthard chats with Kelly about survival, balance, and writing short. MORE >>

     
  10. WINTER 2017 FLASH FICTION WINNERS

The results are in! After careful deliberation our honorable guest judge, literary agent Abby Saul of The Lark Group, has made her final decisions. Read the winning stories of the 750 words or less Winter 2017 Flash Fiction Competition. MORE >>


COLUMN: THE SUBMISSION

  1. SUBMIT 'TIL YOU MAKE IT

When asked, I tell people I have been writing my whole life—which is true. As evidence, I have a couple decades worth of diaries I’ve lugged around during each of the seven times I moved. That said, even though I’ve been writing my entire life, it actually wasn’t until 2011 that I realized some vital facts and aspects of my writing practice: that my memoir wouldn’t write itself, that if I wanted to be a writer then I would have to actually write, that getting published would mean I’d have to submit my work somewhere (where?!?), and that sharing my story could be an act of compassion for a reader, as well as for myself. In other words, 2011 is the year that I started to take myself seriously as a writer. By Chelsey Clammer. MORE >>

     
  2. WHAT MY SUBMISSIONS SPREADSHEET TEACHES ME

When we submit our work for publication, we need to dig through the chaos to find that kernel of logistical thinking that exists in all of us. Why? Because submitting is a practice of planning ahead, an act of doing something now that will help us later. In other words, there’s this thing called organization, and it’s helpful. Chelsey Clammer provides you with a sample submission spreadsheet and tips on how to organize yours. MORE >>

     
  3. HARD-WORKING WRITER SEEKS WIDELY-READ JOURNAL

Submitting your writing for publication is essentially a type of online dating. You search through candidates, find the one you really like, send a message, and then wish for awesomeness to happen—such as a union between your writing and a literary journal as officiated by publication. Chelsey Clammer shows you how to romance your editor.  MORE >>

     
  4. REJECTION ACCEPTANCE: INTERVIEW WITH JAC JEMC

As someone who perceives the glass as neither half-empty nor half-full, but rather, “Hot damn! There’s something in that glass,” I approach rejections with some optimism in the form of “Hmm. Next.” Not to say that getting a rejection is a joyous moment of my day. No one enjoys getting a submission response that contains the word “unfortunately.” For me, those emails unfortunately are not rare. Chelsey Clammer chats with author and Hobart editor Jac Jemc about why it's so important to have a healthy relationship with your rejection letters. MORE >>

     
  5. THE SUBMISSION: FIND OR FLING? FIGURING OUT WHERE TO SUBMIT

The most helpful sentence in a rejection letter I’ve ever received is: “Though it’s not right for us, you have a great story here, and I’m certain it will find a home soon.” It’s that one word—“home”—that got me to really understand how submitting your work for publication isn’t about finding a journal that likes you, but rather finding the right place for your words to live. Publishing is about your writing moving into the pages of one specific space, and then living out the rest of its life there. Chelsey Clammer shows you how to go house hunting for your words. MORE >>

     
  6. THE SUBMISSION: CARING ABOUT COVER LETTERS

The following column explores the different ways one can write a cover letter when submitting a piece of writing to a journal or magazine for publication. This column looks at a number of styles and tones an author may consider when writing a cover letter, and how those elements could be tinkered with according to the actual piece that is being submitted and where. It also points out the standard aspects of a cover letter to include. This column is 1330 words and is not under consideration elsewhere. I have specifically written it for you. By Chelsey Clammer. MORE >>

     
  7. THE SUBMISSION: HOW TO HOLD YOUR HORSES

Patience. Writers don’t just need it, but we need the unabridged herculean edition of it. Because after we submit a piece for publication, it truly feels like we’re just waiting for the waiting to end. There are times that this waiting can feel overwhelming. It can distract us and make us feel obsessed. It can make it hard to concentrate on other pieces of writing. But wait we must because there is not one thing about the writing process we can rush. By Chelsey Clammer. MORE >>

     
  8. BREATHE AND PROCEED: POET TAMMY ROBACKER ON HOW TO SUBMIT THE HARD STUFF

Submitting is an act of vulnerability: to take what you’ve written and then subject it to being assessed by someone else. Someone you don’t know. Whether you’re an essayist putting your darkest moments on the page or a novelist who creates a potentially risky plot, submitting the words you birthed is a brave act. Tammy Robacker, an award-winning poet and author of the recently released Villain Songs, knows all about this. Her poems grapple with and explore complex topics, such as family, loss, grief, the body, women’s issues, and many other kinds of difficult emotional subject matter. In the following interview, Robacker provides a number of helpful suggestions for all writers who are confronting the submission process with their pages brimming with hard subjects. MORE >>

CLASSIFIEDS

   

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Writing About Sensitive Topics for Young Adults: Interviews with YA Authors Ellen Hopkins, Cheryl Rainfield, and Jay Asher
How Five International Freelance Writers Got Their First Break
Literary Agent to Indie Authors: Stephanie Phillips of SBR Media
Danica Davidson: From Rejection to 17 Book Contracts
Your Writing 
niche is More Than a Topic
How to Write With (Or Despite) Kids by Andrea Lani
How to Hold Your Horses
How to Hold Your Horses
Caring About Cover Letters (because nothing says
Find or Fling? Figuring Out Where to Submit by Chelsey Clammer
Rejection Acceptance: Interview with Jac Jemc by Chelsey Clammer
Hard-Working Writer Seeks Widely-Read Journal by Chelsey Clammer
What My Submissions Spreadsheet Teaches Me by Chelsey Clammer
Submit 'Til You Make It by Chelsey Clammer
How I Built a Platform of 100 Crowdfunding Supporters in 45 Days
Telling the Story in Captions
Interview with Brevity's Managing Editor Kelly Sundberg
How to Write and Publish Listicles
Making Short Writing Gigs Sweet
Your Book's Tagline: Make It Snappy
 
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