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Issue 59 - WOW! Women On Writing: Getting Published

ARTICLES

  1. SELF-PUBLISHING: THE DEBATE IS OVER

If you are a writer, you’ve already heard plenty of debate on the validity of self-publishing. Here’s the thing: the debate is over. Self-publishing is now a proven, credible, and viable path towards publication. Thousands of forward thinking authors and business professionals are now choosing to self-publish their books. They are establishing themselves and earning substantial incomes. They are taking their destiny into their own hands instead of waiting for permission. At no other time in our history would this have been possible. Is the debate over for you? Are you ready to move forward? Deana Riddle shows you how! MORE >>

     
  2. THE ENERGIZING SPIRIT OF TRANSITION: DIVERGENT PATHS TO PUBLICATION

When do-it-yourself publishing first came on the scene, many writers saw it as a means to an end. If queries and sample chapters couldn’t get traditional publishers to sit up and take notice, maybe a proven track record would. Success stories like Christopher Paolini and Amanda Hocking, whose determination and hard work garnered contracts with traditional publishers, proved it was possible. While traditional publishing remained my goal, this new model seemed to be a path to consider . . . Kathy Higgs-Coulthard interviews four authors—Nan Cappo, Bryan Chick, Susan Kaye Quinn, and S.R. Johannes—who have successfully made the transition from traditional publishing to self-publishing (or vice versa) to help you decide which path to publication is right for you. MORE >>

     
  3. 20 QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY ALI LUKE

Writers struggle with a seemingly impossible choice: slogging your way through endless queries, proposals, and chapter samples in the hopes of scoring a traditional publishing contract or become writer, editor, publisher, and promoter of your own work. Most of us see this as an all-or-nothing choice—we see indie authors shut out of traditional publishing, and traditionally published authors raging against a supposedly “inferior” product. You can’t be a fence-sitter in the publishing biz, right? English writer, blogger, and coach Ali Luke simply knocked the fence down and created a path all her own. Not afraid to explore every avenue publishing offers, Ali has self-published a series of successful nonfiction e-books through her website; and after being stuck in the slush pile for years, she decided to take the plunge and self-publish her debut novel, Lycopolis, earlier this year. Recently, she scored a traditional publishing deal from John Wiley & Sons. Find out how she’s managed to be so successful in this interview by Steff Metal. MORE >>

     
  4. RECOGNIZING WHEN SMALL PRESS IS BEST

Big house? Or indie press? How do you decide? In this informative article, C. Hope Clark outlines the pros and cons to help you discover which choice is best for your book. MORE >>

     
  5. HOW TO FIND A LITERARY AGENT

Once a book reaches completion, a writer’s work truly begins. Join Del Sandeen as she covers the scoop on literary agents and the process of finding the right one to make a writer’s dream come alive. MORE >>

     
  6. IMPRESSING THE GATEKEEPERS: WHAT AGENTS AND EDITORS SEEK IN SUBMISSIONS

If you’ve put a year into writing your book, you should put in a few extra hours towards proofreading, crafting a strong query letter, and researching your target agents and markets. Devon Ellington chats with Jessica Faust, literary agent and owner of BookEnds, LLC; Heather Osborn, editorial director of Samhain Publishing; and Stephany Evans, literary agent and president of FinePrint Literary Management, who share their best advice on submissions. Included is a helpful section on cover letters! MORE >>

     
  7. HOW TO WRITE A BAD QUERY LETTER: WHAT NOT TO DO

We all hear advice on how to write a query letter, but what are some common mistakes that aspiring authors make when querying? In this how-to Jennifer Wright gives us insider information on what NOT to do. As a freelancer for a New York based literary agency she spends most of her day digging through the slush pile. MORE >>

     
  8. HOW TO PITCH A LITERARY AGENT AT A WRITERS’ CONFERENCE

Writers attend conferences for many reasons, but one of the biggest draws is the literary agent pitch sessions. Writers get face-to-face time with those in the industry who often appear unreachable. If done correctly, these three-to-ten-minute sessions can land a writer an agent and eventually a book contract. From her experience as the director of the Northern Colorado Writers’ Conference for the past four years, freelancer Kerrie Flanagan has had the opportunity to interact with literary agents on a different level. In this article, she walks you through the steps you need to take to prepare your pitch before you sit down with an agent, the pitch itself, and the follow up. She also talks to several literary agents who share their advice with you on the subject: Jon Sternfeld of the Irene Goodman Agency, Kristin Nelson of Nelson Literary, Jessica Regel of Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency, and Ken Sherman of Ken Sherman and Associates. MORE >>

     
  9. HOW TO WRITE A NONFICTION BOOK PROPOSAL

In order to attract the interest of a large publisher, authors must know how to compose an enticing book proposal. Join Annette Fix as she takes us along the right path to write an irresistible one for nonfiction.  MORE >>

     
  10. WRITING FOR THE EDUCATIONAL MARKET

When a writer states, “I’m an educational writer,” people imagine hours spent writing books like Dick and Jane or items for standardized tests—not exactly the most exciting work. However, educational writing currently comes in many shapes and sizes. Some educational writers pen books for companies like Scholastic Teaching Resources, Libraries Unlimited, Wright Group, and Enslow Publishers, Inc. Others create lesson plans, testing passages, and even captions for illustrations in encyclopedias. Some work for developmental houses that contract with educational publishers. Experienced education writers receive book contracts from editors without even pitching ideas. In this article, Margo L. Dill shows you how to get started in educational writing, what pay range to expect, and she chats with expert writers in this market (Alice McGinty, Nancy Sanders, Veda Boyd Jones, Pam K. Hill, Suzanne Lieurance, and Sara Latta) who share their best tips and resources, including publishing companies and links to submission guidelines. MORE >>

     
  11. CREATING FOR CHILDREN: BREAKING INTO A COMPETITIVE MARKET

Considered trying your hand at writing for children but don’t know where to start? Well, look no further. Carol Parenzan Smalley takes us from board books to Young Adult and shares her best tips! MORE >>

     
  12. GET CRAFTY: 7 TIPS FOR SUCCESS IN THE CRAFT MARKET

Michelle Mach loved making jewelry, but quickly found out it could be an expensive hobby. Several years ago, she realized that she needed to figure out a way to make money from her hobby or scale back. A quick trip to the local bookstore with rows of craft magazines made her realize that she could sell a handmade necklace for $30—or sell the how-to instructions to a magazine for two to five times that amount and still sell the necklace after publication. Whether you love knitting, scrapbooking, cross-stitch, painting, sewing, card making, jewelry design, or dozens of other crafts, Michelle shares seven tips to help you succeed, as well as seven writer’s markets to try. MORE >>

     
  13. HOW TO USE THE WRITER’S EYE TO TURN PERSONAL EXPERIENCES INTO COLD, HARD CASH

Few writers would exclude personal writing from their repertoire, but many have no idea how to turn their personal experiences into cold, hard cash. With a few easy pointers, though, you can learn how to mine your personal experiences and spark ideas from everyday life situations, which will yield plenty of opportunities to expand your sales. Lisa Tiffin shows you how! MORE >>

     
  14. 5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW TO WRITE FOR MAGAZINES

With some perseverance and know-how, seeing your article in a magazine can be a reality. There are five basic steps to getting your work published; and by following these steps, you will increase your success rate and your byline count. Kerrie Flanagan shares her secrets of writing for magazines by showing you how to analyze the style of a magazine (with real examples from publications), and includes a detailed section on how to write an effective query letter. MORE >>

     
  15. KAREN RIGBY: FROM PEN & PAPER TO PUBLISHED

Writing poetry to share with the world is a challenge, and getting those poems into print can seem like a daunting task. Join Susan L. Eberling as she chats with NEA-award-winning, published poet, Karen Rigby who shares her practical and encouraging tips about poetry writing. MORE >>

     
  16. SMALL PRESSES SEEKING CHILDREN’S AND YOUNG ADULT MANUSCRIPTS

Once the rush of being a NaNoWriMo champion wears off, more often than not, panic sets in about the revision process. To help you keep your eye on the prize, Krissy Brady shares five publishing companies that accept children’s and young adult manuscripts. (Psst . . . they also accept unagented submissions from first-time authors!) Learn how to pitch to Dawn Publications, Fitzhenry & Whiteside, Flashlight Press, Immedium, and Scarletta Press. Find out their writer’s guidelines, what to pitch, submission etiquette, editor’s tips, and more! MORE >>

     

ONLINE WORKSHOPS & WRITING CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, creativity, memoir, personal essay, grammar, food writing, freelance writing, novel writing, finding a literary agent, blogging, social networking for authors, independent publishing, and more. MORE >>

     

CLASSIFIEDS

   

Dream Quest One Poetry and Writing Contest

Write a poem, 30 lines or fewer on any subject, or writing a short story, 5 pages max, any theme, for a chance to win cash prizes totaling $1,275.00. Postmark deadline: July 31, 2014

Visit http://www.dreamquestone.com for details and enter!


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The Den supports your writing with live calls and webinars, e-courses and bootcamps, forums, private messages, and our popular Junk-Free Job Board.

Join the Freelance Writers Den


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Become a Six-Figure Copywriter

Turn the writing skills you already have into a highly-paid recession-proof profession . . . working part time! You're already a writer. Find out how you can earn $100 to $150 per hour from this little-known lucrative business.

Meet copywriter Pat McCord and learn about the Accelerated Six-Figure Copywriting Program.


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Self-Publishing: The Debate is Over
Divergent Paths to Publication
Twenty Questions answered by Ali Luke - Author, Blogger, Writing Coach
Impressing the Gatekeepers: Jessica Faust, Heather Osborn, Stephany Evans
How to Pitch to an Agent
Writing for the Educational Market by Margo L. Dill
Get Crafty: 7 Tips for Success in the Craft Market
How 2 Use the Writer's Eye To Turn Personal Experiences into Cold, Hard Cash
5 Things You Need to Know to Write for Magazines by Kerrie Flannagan
Publishers Seeking Unagented Children's and YA Manuscripts
Fall 2013 Flash Fiction Contest Winners!
 
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