Issue 91: Loving the Lyric: A Focus on Form


AddThis Social Bookmark Button

SHARE |

Custom Search

Q2 2019 Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest

Fall 2018 Flash Fiction Contest

Q1 2018 Flash Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest

Summer 2018 Flash Fiction Contest

Q4 2018 Creative Nonfiction Essay Contest

Spring 2018 Flash Fiction Contest






2008 - 2016


Truly Useful Site Award

 

 

 

 

Go to wow-womenonwriting.comArticlesContestMarketsBlogClasses
Loving the Lyric: A Focus on Form

EDITOR’S DESK

    WELCOME: LOVING THE LYRIC: A FOCUS ON FORM

Lyric writing is a genre that is difficult to pin down. Some editors say that they know it when they read it; some say it’s a transformative experience—a feeling, mood, or movement—while others say it asks readers to fill in gaps and make leaps; and others have a more practical definition—it’s more about form than story. In this issue, we interview editors of literary magazines about the lyric form and what they’re looking for in submissions; we interview young adult authors of historical fiction novels in verse; we chat with a poet about her book launch and utilizing the media. We also have how-tos on lyric essay and lyric poetry writing, and a great selection of unusual literary journal markets to try. MORE >>

     

FLASH FICTION CONTEST

    SPRING FLASH FICTION CONTEST WITH GUEST JUDGE LITERARY AGENT SAVANNAH BROOKS

Do you need some writing inspiration? Contests are a great way to spark your creativity, and you may even win a prize! Get your best work together and consider entering the WOW! quarterly flash fiction contest with guest judge, literary agent Savannah Brooks with the Jennifer De Chiara Literary Agency. Stop by the contest page, download the pdf guidelines, and read all about Savannah’s preferences. The Spring Contest is open to all genres of fiction between 250 - 750 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. Over $1350 in cash prizes. MORE >>

     

CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

    CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST

WOW! is proud to introduce our newest essay contest! Writers have been asking us to host an essay contest for many years, and we’ve finally listened. The mission of this essay contest is to inspire creative nonfiction and provide well-rewarded recognition to contestants. The contest is open globally; age is of no matter; and entries must be in English. Your story must be true, but the way you tell it is your chance to get creative. We are open to all styles of essay—from personal essay to lyric essay to hybrid essay, and beyond! Word Count: 200 – 1,000 words. Only 300 stories are accepted, so enter early to ensure your spot in the contest. 1st Place: $500. MORE >>

     

WRITING WORKSHOPS & ONLINE CLASSES

    WOW! WOMEN ON WRITING CLASSROOM

Whether you are looking to boost your income or work on your craft, we know that education is an important part of a writer’s career. That’s why WOW! handpicks qualified instructors and targeted classes that women writers will benefit from. All of the courses operate online and are taught one-on-one with the instructor and in a workshop. The flexibility of the platform allows students to complete assignments on their own time and work at their own pace in the comfort of their own home. Visit the classroom page and check out our current line up of workshops: creative nonfiction writing, personal essay, memoir, fiction writing, writing for children, screenwriting, playwriting, ghostwriting, freelance writing, blogging, author platform, independent publishing, poetry writing, copy editing, travel writing and more. MORE >>

     

ISSUE 91: FEATURES

  1. LYRIC ESSAYS AND THE POWER OF LANGUAGE TO TRANSFORM: AN INTERVIEW WITH CHAUNA CRAIG, CNF EDITOR FOR ATTICUS REVIEW

When I tell people I write lyric essays, I get blank stares. They correct me, do you mean lyrical essays? Or they say, aren’t those just poems? When I try to define it, I sometimes fumble. In graduate school, I learned lyric essays are scene driven—not stories—with lots of description. I learned that lyric essays often employ research and weave that into personal reflections. They are sometimes described in terms of form: they are short, fragmented, braided, etc. It feels as if all these definitions fit, yet none are definitive. And perhaps with any experimental form of writing, definitions must, by necessity, be up for discussion. Chauna Craig and I tried to narrow it down, but perhaps only widened the field of possibility when trying to pin down this mysterious and alchemic form. Interview by Naomi Kimbell MORE >>

     
  2. ON LYRIC ESSAYING AND CASTING ON

Chelsey Clammer writes a lyric essay on the process of writing a lyric essay and knitting! She talks about patterns—both in writing and in knitting—and how important forming connections is, as well as leaving gaps—holes—to let readers take a breath, fill in the intentional blanks themselves. She’s writing an essay that looks like knitting. She says lyric essays are all about exploring the possibilities of ideas. That the meaning is in the exploration. She also provides writers with a practical sidebar at the end of the article that defines the lyric essay, shares examples of different essay structures, and even includes several writing exercises, so you can write your own lyric essay. MORE >>

     
  3. FROM THE DESK OF ELENA M. STIEHLER, EDITOR OF THE SONDER REVIEW: THE LYRIC ESSAY AND WORKING WITH WRITERS

When considering lyric writing, it’s hard to ignore the work of independent literary journals like The Sonder Review (TSR). Sonder combines innovative, short creative nonfiction and fiction pieces alongside original works of art. Speaking with the modest and thoughtful Elena M. Stiehler, the founder/executive editor of The Sonder Review and Sonder Press, she offered her insight into the process of an independent journal and press. We discussed her reflections on lyric writing, language, and craft. She shared her selection and editing process, as well as her pleasure in discovering the potential in new writers. She has a genuine love of words and writing. By Christy O’Callaghan. MORE >>

     
  4. TO SUBMIT OR NOT SUBMIT? AN INTERVIEW WITH BECKY TUCH, FOUNDING EDITOR OF THE REVIEW REVIEW

Submitting to literary magazines still holds a great deal of prestige and is a milestone in a writer’s career and part of platform building for many fiction and creative nonfiction authors and poets. Admittedly, I am one of those writers who has struggled to justify the return of investment of time and money against low acceptance rates. At the same time, submitting to literary magazines, like so many other things in our writing careers, can be an important opportunity for authors not to miss out on. This is why I asked Becky Tuch, founding editor of The Review Review which brings writers together to help us gather the information we need as to whether it’s worth submitting to literary magazines. Interview by Dorit Sasson. MORE >>

     
  5. SWITCH IT UP! LITERARY MAGAZINES SEEKING UNUSUAL AND UNCOMMON STORIES

A promising relationship gone bad. The joys and challenges of parenthood. Triumph over a difficult childhood. Many stories center around themes like these—with characters acting out and working through emotional situations and events. While these stories are definitely poignant and universal, there are plenty of other topics worth exploring in your writing. Along those lines, numerous literary magazines actively solicit writing on specific, distinct topics, encouraging writers to spread their wings by tackling diverse subject matter. By Kimberly Lee. MORE >>

     
  6. THREE TYPES OF LYRIC POETRY TO FIRE UP YOUR WRITING PRACTICE

Lyric Poetry is a diverse category of writing that can enhance not only your poetry but your prose as well. It encompasses, but is not limited to, poems in praise called odes; poems in grief known as elegies; and persona poems, where the poet takes on a character role, voicing conflicts and emotions aloud as a different speaker. By Melanie Faith. MORE >>

     
  7. SEEKING THE SOUL OF THE STORY: HISTORICAL FICTION IN VERSE: A CONVERSATION WITH MARILYN NELSON, STEPHANIE HEMPHILL, AND MELANIE CROWDER

When we think of poetry, unless we have studied the genre in depth, often what comes to mind are the playful poems of our childhood or the dramatic monologues from our college days. And although we may remember stories told through epic ballads, such as that of Gilgamesh, or Shakespearean sonnet-infused tragedies, rarely do we acquaint poetry with modern day young adult (YA) novels. Yet, in 2018, two novels in verse made it on Publisher’s Weekly Top YA list. YA historical fiction in verse seems to be on the rise. What is it about poetry that allows it to traverse the boundaries of genre? Join Women on Writing for a conversation with Marilyn Nelson, Stephanie Hemphill, and Melanie Crowder, three YA authors who find poetry to be the perfect tool to bring history alive for YA audiences. Interview by Katherine Higgs-Coulthard. MORE >>

     
  8. UTILIZING THE MEDIA WITH MARYBETH NIEDERKORN

You’ve got your first book of poetry. Congratulations! But now you have to turn your creative talents to marketing, and that can be a confusing or scary process for new poets. I sat down with poet and journalist Marybeth Niederkorn to discuss her successful book launch and how poets and authors can use the media in their marketing strategy. Interview by Shana Scott. MORE >>

     
  9. FALL 2018 FLASH FICTION WINNERS

The results are in! After careful deliberation our honorable guest judge, literary agent Heather Flaherty with The Bent Agency, has made her final decisions. Read the winning stories of the 750 words or less Fall 2018 Flash Fiction Competition. MORE >>

     
  10. Q2 2019 CREATIVE NONFICTION ESSAY CONTEST WINNERS

Check out the results of our latest essay contest! Read the winning essays of the 1,000 words or less Q2 2019 Essay Competition. MORE >>

ISSUE 90: FEATURES

  1. HOW TO WRITE AN EFFECTIVE NONFICTION BOOK PROPOSAL

A well-crafted proposal can be the difference between a yes and a no thank you. It is a strategically composed document that sells your book idea, and you as an expert to potential agents or publishers. When done effectively, they will sing your praises and offer you a contract. Here are the sections you need to include in your proposal. By Kerrie Flanagan MORE >>

     
  2. HOW TO WRITE BLURBS THAT SELL!

How to write a blurb 101: You put your main character in, you don’t need that secondary character. Detail the conflict with just enough to get the questions rising inside the reader’s head but not too much that you begin answering those questions or deflating any of the big moments in the book. Hook with a last sentence that drives them panting to open the book and start reading. That’s the general idea. But there’s a lot more to it because we have to contend with more than just the back cover blurb. Read on to find out what elements are needed to craft a dynamic blurb that sells your book. By Karen S. Wiesner. MORE >>

     
  3. WHAT I LEARNED FROM MY SECOND BOOK LAUNCH

In 2013, I published my first novel, King of the Class. Three months later, Three months later, I wrote a post titled, “What I Learned from Publishing my First Novel.” It was a necessary integration of what I’d gleaned after three months of full-time, dedicated hard work—the kind of twenty-four-hour work after which you can’t even think about the topic. I was burnt out of book marketing, and the post was cathartic. Now, three months after publishing my second novel, Passport Control, I returned to that post. Some things have changed dramatically, while others remain the same. Here are eight new things I learned. By Gila Green. MORE >>

     
  4. HOW TO BUILD YOUR AUTHOR PLATFORM BEFORE YOU ARE PUBLISHED

Building your author platform is not as scary as it sounds. It is also not as complex. Sure, there are a number of bells and whistles that go along with creating the platform that is going to help sell your book, but all the pieces end up fitting together like that of a puzzle. And before you know it, you are staring at an effective online presence made specifically for you. In this article, Jenna Faccenda chats with authors Suzanne Palmieri, Liz Schulte, Sabrina York, Grace Burrowes, Joanna Penn, as well as marketing experts Cassie Drumm and Penny Sansevieri, who share their best tips on building an author platform. MORE >>

     
  5. THE LAZY GUIDE TO TWITTER (AND MY 5-5-5 RULE)

As a writer, how much time do you spend on social media? While it’s an essential marketing tool, social media can also drain your energy for other projects (the far more important ones). So I devote quite a bit of my social media energy and attention to Twitter as it’s an excellent place to network with writers (and readers). To save time on this social media platform, I developed my very own 5-5-5 Rule (otherwise known as my “lazy rule”) for Twitter. When I follow this rule, my engagement increases and my followers increase—all for the price of a little effort each day. By Nicole Pyles. MORE >>

     
  6. HOW TO USE INSTAGRAM TO BUILD YOUR AUDIENCE

Did you know Instagram has one billion users worldwide? Do you want to build your audience as a writer? Considering using Instagram, but not sure if it's worth it? Let’s look at why authors are turning to Instagram to build their online following. Want to learn more? Keep reading to find out! By Loie Dunn. MORE >>

     
  7. BOOK MARKETING WITH SEO: INTERVIEW WITH HEATHER LLOYD MARTIN

Globally recognized as “the pioneer of SEO copywriting,” Heather Lloyd Martin knows a thing or two about the brainchild behind Google and how to use search engine optimization (SEO), so that writers and authors can optimize their sites and be found by the right readers. As the President and CEO of The SEO Content Institute, Heather talks about SEO essentials writers need to connect with their readers from background reading to keyword research. Interview by Dorit Sasson. MORE >>

     
  8. HOW PODCASTING CAN HELP INCREASE YOUR PRESENCE FOR YOUR WRITING CAREER

Podcasting is one of the greatest platforms to start building more presence for your writing career. It takes work on your part, but the work pays off; and you never know where podcasting can take you in your career. The possibilities are endless. You are creating a positive impact on others and yourself while having the freedom to express your true self. Read on to find out how to start your own podcast today! By Sheena Yap Chan. MORE >>

     
  9. BEING SMART WITH YOUR MARKETING DOLLARS: AN INTERVIEW WITH SKYE WARREN

Skye is known around the blogosphere as the author who spent $100K on Facebook ads and generated $850K in profit from those ads. Her secret is to test multiple ads at one time, spending low amounts of money, until she finds the ad that works to find new readers. Once she figures out which ad is “winning,” she spends more money on that ad or an ad similar to it. She explains more below about her philosophy of marketing and what to consider below. Your head may be spinning when it’s over, so grab a notebook and pen, and get ready to take notes from an author in the trenches. By Margo L. Dill. MORE >>

CLASSIFIEDS

   
Two-4-One Kid Critiques

Two-4-One Kid Critiques

Double your chance for success!

Get two critique edits of your manuscript for the price of one!

We specialize in children’s books.

Check out our service at: www.two4onekidcritiques.com


-----

Learn How to Grow Your Writing Income!

Writers: Ready to stop starving? We can help. The Freelance Writers Den is a supportive place where freelance writers learn how to grow their income—fast.

The Den supports your writing with live calls and webinars, e-courses and bootcamps, forums, private messages, and our popular Junk-Free Job Board.

Join the Freelance Writers Den


-----

Professional Writing Help

Dear students,

If you are having trouble with academic writing, there is a great solution for you. Our experts recommend you visit Smart Writing Service with highly qualified academic writers.

-----

EduBirdie: Research Paper Writing Service

Check out our research paper writing service features. We guarantee that when you pay for research paper it will not only be delivered on time, but will be of the highest quality. If you are a student, you can pay someone at Edubirdie to write your paper in 3 hours.

 

Lyric Essays and the Power of Language to Tranform: An interview with Chauna Craig, editor of Atticus Review
Switch it up! Literary Magazines Seeking Unusual and Uncommon Stories
Elena M. Stiehler, Editor of The Sonder Review
Historical Fiction in Verse: Marilyn Nelson, Stephanie Hemphill, Melanie Crowder
To Submit or Not Submit? Interview with Becky Tuch, Founder of The Review Review
On Lyric Essaying and Casting On
Utilizing the Media with Marybeth Niederkorn
Three Types of Lyric Poetry to Fire Up Your Writing Practice
How Podcasting Can Help Increase Your Presence for Your Writing Career
How to Write an Effective Nonfiction Book Proposal
Book Marketing with SEO: Interview with Heather Lloyd Martin
How to Build Your Author Platform
Facebook Ads: Interview with Skye Warren
How to Write Blurbs that Sell!
What I Learned from My Second Book Launch
The Lazy Guide to Twitter (and My 5-5-5 Rule)
How to Use Instagram to Build Your Audience
Dipping Your Toe in the Freelance Writing Pool
Pitch this Exceptional Breed to Get the Best Freelance Clients
Carving Out a Community by Ann Kathryn Kelly
Muse and Meaning by Ann Kathryn Kelly
Self-Publishing Mistakes I Made (And How I’m Fixing Them
Pay-to-Publish Companies: Are They All Out to Get You?
How to Write for Magazines That Aren’t In Your Demographics
How to Find the Right Markets for Your Ideas
 
  About WOW! Women on Writing | Ad Rates | Contact Us | Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2019 wow-womenonwriting.com All rights reserved.

Graphic Design/Illustration by Mackintosh Multimedia.
Web Design/Programming by Glenn Robnett.