Saturday, December 19, 2009

 

Premium Green: A Supportive Network and Markets Galore!


WOW!'s Premium-Green isn’t just market listings, it’s a guide with community benefits. For only $4 a month, you get a 100+ Page Ebook delivered to your inbox each month, and you’ll have access to a private community of women writers just like you!

The 100+ page ebook has fiction markets, nonfiction markets, markets for women, anthologies, contests, niche markets, new freelance jobs, interviews with editors and freelancers, tips for being a writing mama, and tips from working freelance writers.

We know that becoming a freelance writer takes more than just market listings. You’ll need the opportunity to network with your peers and a support system to help you reach your goals. And that’s exactly what your Premium-Green Markets Subscription will do.

The best part of your $4.00 a month is not even the 100+page ebook, although it is awesome. (And when you subscribe for a year for only $48, you have access to all 26 previous ebooks full of markets and interviews. That's a bargain!) Anyway, the best part of this subscription is a listserv you automatically belong to when you subscribe called the PG boards. I thought I would show you an example of a very informative and supportive conversation that was on the PG boards this month:

Writer One: I write regularly for a regional magazine. My contract to date has allowed me to reprint my work three months after it is published in the magazine. They sent a new contract yesterday. This one says. . .(writer one quotes the part of her contract she's questioning). Am I reading this right? They are asking me to sign away all rights? There's no way I can agree to this. They could make a book of my work, publish it, and I'd gain nothing. Has anyone seen anything like this before? What did you do? I am going to call them to try to renegotiate. Sigh.

Writer Two in response: Did they offer more money for all rights? I'm guessing not, but even if they did, this contract sounds very one-sided. Not only can they edit, reprint, and distribute, but they reserve the right to offer the rights to a third party. I'm assuming that means they can SELL your rights and receive the money themselves, and it means you have no control over what kind of mag your work might appear in next. Definitely call and see what's going on. Maybe you can re-negotiate or at least strike or modify a few phrases.

Writer Three: They've opened negotiations, in my book. Since they are asking for all rights, you need to ask for more money in exchange for the extra piece of the pie they want. They want more - you want more. The average writer would take this and run. While I don't mind selling all rights to most magazine markets (few of them I'll ever use again anyway), I'd want to be compensated for the privilege.

Writer Four: This is the first time I have seen a print periodical take this stance. Almost every digital publication requires you to sign a similar agreement. Reason is, they recognize the coming value in having a backlog of ready content online, and - you're right - for books and ebooks. With the electronic readers coming of age in the next couple of years, it will become easy to sell material as "e" formats. Publishers are preparing. I think we'll see more of that. I, personally, wouldn't agree to such a contract for work I contribute regularly. Maybe on a one-shot article. Kudos to you for reading the thing - many writers don't. Bottom line is, the rights to my work are valuable to me - I won't give them away. If someone wanted to buy all rights, the price would be significant. I just launched a new project 100% based on writing I have done over the past four years. Good thing I own the rights!

Writer One (responding to all who responded to her original question): Good info everyone. Thanks. I agree with you. Most of the time I am willing to write a new story. I have lots of words inside me! I've decided to dig my heels in regarding two situations here. I write a first-person column (essay) for the magazine. Often the stories I tell are very personal. I won't sign them away. Second, I do food articles where I come up with original recipes. I won't sign off rights to my own unique recipes. I've sent this information, in a kind message, to "corporate." We'll see what the lawyers say.

So, as you can see from this actual example of a recent WOW! PG discussion, you can find support on the PG boards and knowledgeable freelancers working in the field. If you have a question or problem, chances are someone from Premium-Green can answer it or knows someone who can. Plus you get the 100+page ebook for $4.00 a month.

PG members will sometimes post contest information or submission calls on the PG boards only and no where else. Recently, there were discussions about ghostwriting and how much to charge, starting a hometown blog, questions about getting paid from a certain market, and a proud mom sharing a beautiful poem her daughter wrote!

If you don't know what to get a writer this holiday season, try a Premium-Green subscription. Or if your spouse or significant other is still wondering what to get you. . .here's the answer. And your subscription is an expense to build your writing career, so you can claim it on your taxes!

Happy Holidays!
Margo Dill
http://margodill.com/blog/
Read These Books and Use Them

Labels: , , , , ,

Saturday, March 28, 2009

 

Am I too old for all-nighters?


(Image courtesy of The Unofficial Stanford Blog)


If there's one thing I despise, it's a missed deadline. I’m definitely guilty of it, but I try my darnedest to meet them--even if that means staying up all night. The problem is, when you're tired you make more mistakes, and when you're finally finished with the project, you want to sleep for days. I think this holds true the older you get. Many of my co-workers and team members ask how I do it all. I don't have a set list of instructions, but I've had plenty of practice.

Before I started WOW!, I pulled many all-nighters for my graphic arts business. Many of my clients wanted their catalogues and ad layouts done yesterday. Being the nice person I am, I always complied with their crazy schedules. Without really realizing it, I got into the habit of donning my Wonder Woman costume and "making it happen." These marathons consisted of a week of nose to the grindstone, sleep deprivation, and lots of caffeine, and later, wine. Thing is, I'm still doing it, for a lot less pay. But when does the time come when I can just relax?

I find that the older I get, there's more need for recovery time. There's more need for vitamins and headache pills. And now, every chance I get, I like to gel in front of the TV and tune-out. Is this the life I really want to lead? I often wonder.

Sticking To My New Year's Resolution

Our team members know this, but I made a New Year's resolution that I'm trying to stick to, and have been fairly successful at--though it's a WIP (work-in-progress). I'm dolling out assignments (paying for them) and delegating more. There comes a time when you have to realize what your time is worth--even in this tough economy. You can do it all yourself, but if it's killing you and not good for your health, or your overall business, why not pay to have someone else handle the task?

Delegating More, Doing Less

This method can be applied to anyone who owns her own business or freelances--which is basically the same thing. So next time you are commissioned by a potential employer and think you can handle it all, why not try tacking on a little extra to your price and having someone else take some of the burden off of your shoulders? That's what being a businesswoman is all about: delegating and moving forward. Form a team of talent that can help when you are in need. Network with individuals in your same field. Be an agent. Never turn down a job. Say yes, find help, and charge accordingly. And lastly, get some sleep already! You don't have to take on everything yourself. Think of your health and well being, like I'm trying to do.

What is your method for working less and maximizing your time? I'd love to hear your advice.

Labels: , , , , , ,